Dyspepsia: Symptoms, causes, and treatments

The symptoms develop during meals or shortly afterward. In most cases, indigestion is a minor problem that often clears up without professional treatment. First, your doctor will try to rule out other health conditions that could be causing your symptoms. She might do blood tests and X-rays of your stomach or small intestine. She might also use a thin, flexible tube with a light and a camera to look closely at the inside of your stomach, a procedure called an upper endoscopy.

Indigestion is not a condition but a group of symptoms that affect digestion. If symptoms are mild and infrequent, lifestyle changes will probably ease them. This usually involves consuming fewer fatty and spicy foods and less caffeine, alcohol, and chocolate. Sleeping for at least 7 hours every night may also help to ease mild indigestion.

If there is no known cause for indigestion, it is referred to as functional dyspepsia. People with acid reflux, stomach flu, irritable bowel, and other conditions may experience indigestion. Find out about the top 10 foods that are easy to digest and may be suitable for these people to include in their diet. Learn about what they are, their nutritional content, and what makes them them easier to eat. If indigestion is caused by a disease or medical condition, the prognosis is varied and dependent upon the resolution of that condition.

Don’t lie down too soon after eating. Limit the use of alcohol. If you use tobacco, try to quit. Stress and lack of sleep also can worsen symptoms.

Prokinetic medications speed up the emptying of the stomach and increase intestinal motility. They include metoclopramide (Reglan) and cisapride (Propulsid).

Learn more about heartburn here. Dyspepsia is mild and infrequent for most people with symptoms. In such cases, no treatment is needed. The symptoms are normally triggered by stomach acid coming into contact with the mucosa.

Though they both have similar triggers, and treatment may be the same in many instances, indigestion isn’t the same thing as heartburn. Indigestion is the condition, and heartburn occasionally is a symptom of indigestion. The condition is also known as dyspepsia or upset stomach.

Indigestion, which is sometimes called dyspepsia, is a general term covering a group of nonspecific symptoms in the digestive tract. It is often described as a feeling of fullness, bloating, nausea, heartburn, or gassy discomfort in the chest or abdomen.

These include citrus, tomatoes, and vinegar. Sometimes it can be hard to pinpoint the cause of this problem.

Depending on what’s causing your indigestion, you may experience abdominal pain, bloating (full feeling), belching and gas, nausea, vomiting, and acidic taste in your mouth, “growling” stomach, and even diarrhea. Symptoms usually get worse when you’re stressed but normally go away in a few hours. Carbonated and alcoholic beverages can also give you heartburn. People who are overweight often suffer from heartburn.

They will also find out about their medical and family histories and examine the chest and stomach. This may involve pressing down on different areas of the abdomen to find out whether any are sensitive, tender, or painful under pressure. Heartburn and dyspepsia are often confused for one another, but they are two separate conditions despite regularly occurring at the same time. Heartburn is a symptom of acid reflux, described as a burning feeling behind the breastbone that usually occurs after eating.

The prognosis for indigestion is generally good if indigestion is caused by lifestyle factors. The outlook for indigestion caused by a disease or medical condition varies depending on the resolution of that condition. Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) – A stomach disorder marked by corrosion of the stomach lining due to the acid in the digestive juices. Because indigestion is a nonspecific set of symptoms, patients who feel sick enough to seek medical attention are likely to go to their primary care doctor.

She specialized in Clinical Pharmacology after her bachelor’s (MBBS). For her, health communication is not just writing complicated reviews for professionals but making medical knowledge understandable and available to the general public as well. Treatment for indigestion can usually be bough over the counter. Antacids are commonly used to neutralize the stomach acids and provide relief. Antacids are meant to work against the acid in your system.

Sometimes people have persistent indigestion that is not related to any of these factors. This type of indigestion is called functional, or non-ulcer dyspepsia. “Indigestion (Dyspepsia).” National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/indigestion-dyspepsia.

indigestion definition medical

Leave a Reply